The Wilberforce Society | Foreign Policy
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Foreign Policy

Writers: Nora Kalinskij*, Thomas Carlile*, Dominic Bealby-Wright*, Christian Wollny *These authors have equally contributed to the paper. A joint paper of Cambridge University's Wilberforce Society & Moscow State Institute of International Relations (MGIMO) [gview file="http://thewilberforcesociety.co.uk.gridhosted.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/SyriaGovernmentPaper-1-1.pdf"] ...

  Writers: Tom Ellis, Walter Myer, Eddie Reynolds, Kartik Upadhyay Editor: Walter Myer Formatted by: Brendan Tan This paper outlines a strategy to improve upon formal and informal recognition of qualifications held by refugees entering the UK. It begins with an overview of UK NARIC, the national body responsible for producing equivalence qualifications. This is followed by discussion of the problem of refugees who lack physical evidence of their qualifications upon arrival. We then turn to the problem of language acquisition, before finally considering official channels of support for refugees as they use their equivalence qualifications to seek employment. In our conclusion, we produce a...

By Qu Tianlu, Chia Jeng Yang, Beatrice Chan, Chiu Chai Hao In this paper, we will examine briefly the background of Islamic State and its manifestation over various social media platforms. We will study how IS capitalised on the advantages conferred by each type of platform to achieve its ends. Subsequently, we will look at social reactions against these activities over social media. Most importantly, we would like to highlight the lack of coordinated UK governmental presence with social media providers to address the problem of IS. This is largely attributed to a confused relationship between the government and social media...

Whilst based in Cheltenham GCHQ evidently operates communications surveillance across both the UK and the wider world. The recent allegations of a GCHQ run listening post at Britain’s German Embassy would seem to support the suggestion that the organisation is involved in collecting data for defending Britain’s interests, in a wider sense than the “What we do” page of the GCHQ website implies, with its focus on the threats faced. Furthermore, it implies a physical geographical extension which is not apparent from the neat division of the services previously attested to. [gview file="http://thewilberforcesociety.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/Intelligence-2.pdf"]...

The most noteworthy aspect of the recent political revolutions in the Arab world is that there is nearly always a failure to suddenly superimpose a democratic style of government based on Western political constitutional foundations onto a set of domestic government institutions. Here, I argue that there is a need to consider the notion of a ‘learning equilibrium’ — to recognise that it takes time for institutions and socio-economic agents to adapt their expectations about the new state of governing such that a stable democratic political environment is generated. I conclude with a generic road-map detailing a general pathway for...

This paper argues for a radical shift in the UK’s policy towards the People's Republic of China (PRC), aiming at a political relationship that transcends the motivation of economic opportunism. It sets out two proposals which present an alternative to the current policy of containment. Instead they promote a relationship of trust and constructive engagement on issues where progress has been lacking for too long. The first proposal calls on the UK government to recommit itself to the democratic development of its former colony of Hong Kong and to establish a Hong Kong Affairs Liaison Committee as a platform for exchange...

The burden of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) is often eclipsed by the overriding demands of handling communicable diseases in the developing world. Developing countries are faced with a double burden of disease as they begin to face an increasing encumbrance from NCDs during an earlier phase of economic development than their high-income counterparts. The solution is of course, in the timeworn policy: prevention. However, unlike communicable diseases, the risk factors for NCDs are often flared up by lifestyle choices and change must therefore come from within the people. This paper recommends that in order to achieve maximum return on investment, governments must...

Twitter: #TWSTunisia The Wilberforce Society is proud to announce the release of its largest project of 2012, a Comprehensive Proposed Constitutional Framework for the Republic of Tunisia, commissioned by the Tunisian National Constituent Assembly. The Report features a new constitutional framework for Tunisia, supported by in-depth research. "An impressive Constitution." Constitutional Law Professor and Supreme Court advocate, Laurence Tribe of Harvard Law School, on TWS's project.   Media coverage includes article at Tunisia Live. Press release Contact: Mr. George Bangham Telephone: +44(0)7854 392060 Email: chairman@wilberforcesociety.co.uk CAMBRIDGE, UK, 26/09/2012 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY CONSULTANTS AUTHOR PROPOSED TUNISIAN CONSTITUTION Commissioned Think Tank is the Only U.K. Group to Draft a Comprehensive Anti-Corruption Constitution...

TWS's first Annual Conference, held in January 2012 on the theme of 'Public Policy for Cyberspace', was accompanied by our introduction to the policy debates surrounding this area. The paper was written by our specially-formed subcommittee on cyberspace, chaired by Albert Beardow. Please email policy@wilberforcesociety.co.uk for more information. [gview file="http://thewilberforcesociety.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2012/01/Public_Policy_for_Cyberspace.pdf" save="1"]...

A new paper by George Bangham and Sarang Shah, examining the UK's National Security Council since its formation by David Cameron in 2010. Locating the NSC’s formation in wider debates on the UK’s constitution, the executive authority of the Prime Minister within Cabinet government, and the role of military intelligence in policymaking, it proposes two major changes to the NSC’s role and its associated regulatory framework. Firstly, it is proposed that the NSC be placed on a statutory footing as an amendment to current legislation in the Intelligence Services Act (1994). Defining the NSC’s existence and requiring its decision on certain executive...